Tropical Queensland

It has been a few weeks since we are back home but there are a couple more posts at least to complete our trip to Australia.  The last week we were there we went up to Port Douglas, fully aware that a cyclone had devastated Fiji and

You thought I was kidding...

Whitesunday but we had booked and organized everything so we went head and hoped for the best.

This time we flew with Virgin Blue and it was a much more pleasant experience than Quantas.  Everybody from airport staff to airplane crew were very friendly and helpful both on the way to Cairns and on the return flight.  At the airport in Melbourne we also met Joseph Pouliotis, our friend from Adelaide who actually had just landed in Melbourne.  We could not see anything on our approach to the Cairns International Airport as the clouds hung low and there were heavy rains.  We quickly made our way to the rental company, everything seemed to be a bit more chaotic than at the airports we had seen in Australia and this was low season.  We picked up our Suzuki Vitara, I would never recommend this car to anyone.  Port Douglas is about 60 kays north of Cairns and the road, named after James Cook,  is beautiful.  The windy road takes you close to many beaches and the view is just plain spectacular, it would have been even better if the skies were not gray.  On our way we past well known beaches like Palm Cove, Trinity Beach, Turtle Beach and others.

Port Douglas was established a little over 100 years ago as a mining town and it was almost deserted at the beginning of the 20th century after the completion of the Kuranda Railway in Cairns and a devastating cyclone in 1911 that left only two buildings standing.  In the 1960s the town had a population of less than 100.  It wasn’t until the 80’s when the town started to develop into one of the best towns in Australia, it currently ranks on the #3 spot on the 100 Best Towns in Australia.  It certainly is a great town.  It is a

Four Mile Beach

tropical little heaven with very good beaches and although in high season it doubles in size the town is very small and you can walk it in a couple of hours.  On its north side there are very nice homes on a hill that overlooks the Four Mile Beach and the tropical forest that extends all the way to the beach.  We stayed on Macrossan Street in a place called Reflections of Port Douglas and Carmel, the owner, made everything possible to make our stay comfortable.  Her apartments are great but what I found outstanding is her hospitality and easy going manner, Ben will miss her. Reflections is about two minutes from the beach and five minutes from the center of town so its location is great especially if you have a baby with you.

We only had three full days in Port Douglas so we had to make the most out of it.  The main reason for going to Port Douglas was for Beth to go the Great Barrier Reef, one of the two world heritage in the area.  So we organized for her to go on a boat on Tuesday, the only day where the weather was going to be half-decent.  As Beth gets seasick we had very

We can only imagine how beautiful it can be...

little choice as we had to choose the biggest ship that went out there.  We chose Quicksilver and if you ever have the chance avoid them.  The crew seemed very rude before they even left and from what Beth described they were not very helpful or nice.  Anyway, we suspected that it might be that way but we had to choose them.  It was already late afternoon so we quickly went onto the Four Mile Beach and took a stroll down the beach.  The beach was closed for swimming and the sea was rough but what made this visit to the beach memorable were the warning signs around it.  Crocodiles, stingers, slippery rocks, strong currents, tides and we shall not forget the stingrays, Steve Irvin the “Crocodile Hunter” was killed by one off the shores of Port Douglas.  So as with most places in Australia dangers lurk around but we adhered to the quintessential Australian adage of no worries and walked on the beach, to be fair we were not alone.  Macrossan St. is really the center of town and we headed out that way when we came back from the beach.  We found good food, good desserts and as always great coffee, prices were fair with the exception of ice cream which is very expensive everywhere in Australia and not

Quicksilver Boat

really as good as our gelaterias here in Germany.  Of course all shops were closed and that is really I never understood about Australia, why do shops close so early?  We were forced not to spend any money, which is not bad after all.  Most liquor shops though are open until very late, I guess work little drink a lot is the motto!  That is not bad, not bad at all.

The Port Douglas Marina

The next day Beth went on to the Great Barrier Reef with Quicksilver and the day did not look good at all.  Skies were gray, clouds hung low and it was windy, which means that out in the open sea the waves would be rough.  There are hundreds of people that fit on the quicksilver and looking at them board I was wondering if they had read the weather report.  There were people with strollers, families with toddlers, elderly people that needed assistance to walk, did they know what they were in for?  Ben and me waited for mum to board and we sat at a bar at the marina to have a coffee and Ben his milk.  We then got into the car and headed north towards Daintree and Mossmann, I could not wait to get to into the rain forest.  We were disappointed, this area has been cleared long ago

...heading out to the Reef

for the production of mainly sugar cane and sugar cane fields stretched as far as the eye could see.  Mossman is also known for its 2-foot gauge tramways, these trams that look like small trains run along the fields and were crucial for the development of the regional economy and Mossman was bigger and richer than Port Douglas for many years.  We then took to the back roads through tiny towns and sugar cane fields, Ben in the mean time was asleep and did not seem to mind the constant opening and shutting of the door as I had to get out to take pictures.  This region is so

Ben waiting for his mum to come back

far from anything and there are just not enough people so the infrastructure is not as great as one would expect but it is a beautiful place to live.  It is always green, there is the proximity to the highlands and of course the awesome beaches make this region very attractive.  There is always Cairns about 80 km south of Mossman that provides for anything anyone would want.  We drove through some streets where houses were literally in the jungle, it is difficult to imagine how you can live so close to “uncomfortable” nature.  The low clouds provided for some dramatic scenery as the surrounding hills  were engulfed in them.  In the afternoon we went to pick Beth up and watched as the Quicksilver catamaran approached the marina and people disembarked.  It to

Somewhere near Miallo

ok a while but then we saw Beth all wobbly, the first thing she said is food but she pale was as pale as alpine snow.  They encountered rough seas and well over half the people on that boat became seasick, Beth unfortunately was among them.  On the way out she had great difficulty and the pills that they gave her did not help as they did not have time to kick in.  Ben was happy to see his mum, we sat at a restaurant at the marina and something small to eat.  It was still early but Beth had to relax so we drove to the apartment.

We spend four nights in Port Douglas and we went out all four nights, Macrossan St., the main street in Port Douglas is very nice.  It is lined up with small boutique shops (that we never saw in operation) and many restaurants and hotels (remember hotels in Australia are not necessarily hotels in Australia rather they are pubs that may or may not offer rooms to let).   We tried a different restaurant each time and once even tried Mexican (my Burritos are better;), the food was good and prices surprisingly down to earth considering that Port Douglas is considered a high end tourist destination, in Europe prices would have been much higher.  It rained every night but as during the day it was warm.  We decided to drive up to Cape Tribulation on the next day, the route would take us through part of the route that I had just done but we would push on farther north take the ferry over the Daintree river and then drive through the jungle onto Cape Trib as local call it.  The road ends at C

A typical farm in the area

ape Trib and there is dirt truck that is impassable for most cars during wet season for I believe about 100km to Cooktown.  Cooktown is the place where Captain Cook was stranded for a few weeks on the natural harbor after sustaining heavy damage on his lead ship.  It is also in Cooktown that the name Kangaroo came to be as it was one of about 50 words that Cook learned from the local Aborigines, the tribe of Guugu Yimithirr.  It was not until the mid sixties that any kind of road actually reached Cape Trib, it proved to be a lively road with loads of

Thick rainforest

tourists, especially back packers and the younger crowd.  The road took as through field of sugar cane to the Daintree river.  Once we crossed the river we found ourselves in the rainforest, the windy road was very narrow and the trees were towering over the road, there were only a few spots where we could see the gray skies.  It rained almost non stop so we did not have the opportunity to get out of the car for pictures but we nevertheless enjoyed the majestic beauty of one of the oldest forests on earth.  We never got see a Cassowary but we saw plenty of spiders a

On top of the tower in the Daintree Center

nd many warning signs to keep off any creek or river banks because of crocodiles.  We stopped at the Daintree Discover Center, an excellent little center in the rainforest with skywalks and different displays, signs and information explaining and pointing out the peculiarities and uniqueness of the forest.  As it is the rainy season the mosquitos are on overdrive and let

I am not lying....

`me tell you if you are ever in this situation wear bright and shiny colors as they are the best defense against them, as fate had it I had a navy blue t-shirt on which attracted mosquitos like you never seen before, they like to hide in the dark.  We did visit the center and did walk around for about an hour, we even went up the tower that takes you higher than the tree canopies for a breathtaking view (it was cloudy).  It is also here that we saw the tree called the stinging tree or better known locally as “dead man’s itch”.  According to the guide book if you are stung you will believe all the stories that surround this tree, there were signs to warn us.  Well besides the humidity, rain, toxic trees,

Jungle!?!

ferocious mosquitoes we also saw spiders that were bigger than the palm of my hand and supposedly there were snakes around.  It is an experience to say the least but soaking wet with Ben complaining in his pouch I started dreaming about all that snow that we had back home in Germany!  We decided to cut our visit in the center short and head farther north to our destination, Cape Trib.  I found it amazing that there were houses scattered about in this so densely forested region.  I cannot believe that there are people that voluntarily live on in this place, it is one thing to visit or stay for a little while but to live there forever, hmmm!?!  I guess you have to love insects and uncontrolled growth of all sorts of weeds…

So long….

The road to Mossman Gorge

Crocodiles on the beach, dangers in the water... ...I am staying clear of that beach!

Cape Tribulation

Our little man!

My BBs at Cape Trib

Crocodiles are waiting for their meal under the bridge (did not go down to investigate).

That is the view from that bridge...

The Daintree River meets the Pacific Ocean, Snapper Island on the far left

On the Draintree River Ferry

Tourists on the Draintree River

Sydney – Part 2

Beth at the South Head, the Pacific waters in the back

Everything in Sydney is about the harbor.  As one non-Sydney (how do you call someone who lives in Sydney?) resident told me Sydney is the harbor with 5% that have a view of it and 95% who want to have a view of the harbor.  Any property with view of the harbor gets an instant premium on  its value.  Talking about property value, what is going on in Australia is putting me off.  The quality of the housing is terrible to not so terrible but the prices are through the roof.  I was not sure if the quality of the housing was substandard or if it was just the houses we had visited but after talking to recent immigrants to Australia from Europe they all say the same thing.  I cannot believe that this country has forced the light bulbs off the shelves around the globe but otherwise live in highly inefficient houses waisting water, energy and precious resources.  House prices through are really high, even in suburbs that are half an hour away from the CBD a decent place can cost you a million!  The same goes for all major cities in Australia.  It is crazy and stupid, the discussions about property and property values remind me of discussions I had with friends in the US back in 2007.  Is there a housing bubble looming in the  horizon down under?  I do not know but I like the

South Head again with Sydney in the background

German restrain on these matters, we do not get excited about this stuff and we do not like artificial wealth nor much credit.  As usual I tend to trail off so lets get back to the subject at hand.

We spend a week in Sydney and took in all the major sites, we saw the magnificent harbor and all its major sites the first day but we of course returned a couple times and even did a ferry ride to Manly late in the evening and were treated to an awesome sunset.  There is a single entrance of Port Jackson, the entrance is protected by two big rocks called the Heads.  We went to the South Head, through some wonderful little suburbs.  The view from the Head to the west is the city and the Harbor Bridge and on the other side the Pacific Ocean.  The views are grant and the suburb of Watson Bay is really pretty.  The zoo with its sky safari, new elephant baby, an excellent Outback area and many lookout points at the city across the harbor is one of the top ten destinations within Sydney.  The zoo itself is very good but its location and its proximity to water, plus the fact that you can reach it by ferry make it incredibly beautiful.  There was a lot of areas that they were working on, and that took out some of the fun but overall one of the better zoos we have seen.  The suburbs

Coogee Beach

on the north side also looked a lot better and more exclusive that the ones in south but we only drove through and did not linger much.  Closer to the city and next to the Rocks is the Darling Harbor and Chinatown, two parts of the city that are very interesting to visit and tons of stuff to do.  Especially around Darling Harbor there are a lots of restaurants, clubs and cafes.

As always I have to visit the memorials and in Sydney the ANZAC memorial is in Hyde Park, close to the Museum Station on Liverpool St.  There is a “Lake of Reflections”, very similar but much smaller than the one in front of the Lincoln Memorial in DC.  Here I met Tony, a New Zealander veteran of the ANZAC forces in Vietnam.  You would not have guessed looking at the guy but he had done two tours in Vietnam in the late 60’s.  We talked about war, memorials and cowards (…sorry I meant politicians), it was another chance encounter that has made this trip so much more interesting.  It also confirmed that there is always pain and much sacrifice for us to get to where we are and we need to honour that… …remember them and learn to avoid the same mistakes in the future.  We cannot let their sacrifice be in vain.

Ben on Bondi Beach

Of course visiting Sydney without visiting the famous beach of Bondi is like drinking a milkshake without the ice cream.  Bondi beach was crowded, there was also a contest of surfing that was being filmed.  The commotion was incredible, and the weather perfect.  We also visited Coogee and other beaches like Cronulla around Botany Bay.  Botany Bay is also the spot where Captain Cook actually made his first landing in Australia, there is a small memorial in the Botany Bay National Park to mark the spot.  It is incredible to just stand at that spot, look around and see all the development that has taken place in the last 200 years.  I am sure he would not recognize the place today.

Another must for any visits in Sydney is the Blue Mountains.  We took the train from the central station in Sydney and travelled west through the suburbs like Parramatta for about two hours before reaching Katoomba, the gateway to the Blue Mountains.

Bondi Beach Ben and his mum!

We walked down to the lookout and then the short hike to the Three Sisters, the main landmark in the Blue Mountains.  We loved the landscape and we would love to have more time to hike through some of the trails and spend time in this National Park.  Throughout our travels we have enjoyed mountains and forrest parks the most and this one was really very pretty.  The air had a pleasant smell as the Eucalyptus oil that the trees emit permeates the air.  It is also the reason why the mountains look blue from the distance.  This place is a mere 200km away from Sydney  but it is so dense The ANZAC Memorialthat only in the mid 1990’s did they find a pine tree that was thought to be extinct for 90 million years.  This country is so vast that there are still things, species, organisms that have yet to be discovered.  Sydney is where Beth and me fell in love with Australia.  We have seen so much in the past two months but we were awestruck and dumbfounded.  Sydney maybe a city that is very far away from other big cities, Melbourne does not count (at least not for the people of Sydney) but there is a reason why so many people want to come to Sydney.

I would like to also thank our hosts Rita and Tony Vitalis, who took us in for a week and showed us Sydney.  We appreciate their hospitality and hope to reciprocate soon.
So long…

Ben, Beth and Kyriakos on the ANZAC Memorial

Elizabeth on Elizabeth St.

Sydney Tower and the Monorail

QVB, wonderful building!

Ben and Kyriakos on our way to the Apple Store in Sydney

A Memorial

Chillin' in Sydney.

Yeah, Bondi baby!

He is incredible

In Taronga Zoo

Darling Harbor

Ben the bird whisperer

At the zoo

For Ben's profile pic

My BBs

View from Taronga

Magnificent

Bondi Beach

Candid moment

with my mate Rick.

Awesome!

The three sisters

Enjoying the outdoors

Landscape galore...

Our hosts, Rita & Tony Vitalis

Great Ocean Road – Part 2

As far as coffee places is concerned, I stand corrected, I actually have seen a Starbucks it was empty and it is the first one after driving for about 8000km since we got here in the beginning of February and that is fine by me. The drive on the Great Ocean Road was planned from the beginning and it was among the Top 10 things to do in Australia.  Unfortunately, the way things turned out with the weather and all we cut it short by only taking a day to enjoy the drive.  So we decided to take the Princess Highway west and then turn south when we reached Terang and reach Port Campbell, which is at the west end of the Road.  This was necessary as the Road itself is quite narrow with many curves and although the whole length is about 250km it takes more than 4 hours to drive it all.  So we took a shortcut, on the highway to Terang we could drive fast (for Aussie standards) and reach Port Campbell in about 2 1/2 hours.  Again, we drove through some very nice towns, towns like

A candid moment...

Colac, like Camperdown.  The highways in Australia dissect many towns, actually the highway usually forms the main street, so it does make an interesting drive.  Most of these towns are like very much like towns in the US, in the 50s or 60s.  There is a main street where cars park at an angle, there are the occasional McDonalds, KFC or Subway but these sleepy towns are mostly left in peace.  There many shops and combo shops that cater to the needs of the local community.  This is a stark contrast to my personal experience back home or back in the US where, for whatever reason, people tend to shop in national or international chains, where the shops look the same no matter if they are in New York or in Dusseldorf. As soon as we reached Port Campbell we stopped at the Grotto, basically a sink hole with an awesome view.  We got our first taste of what the Great Ocean Road is all about.  It is full of magnificent views, awesome landscape, waves, wind, a dramatic sky and the great wide open ocean, green hills, nice little sea-side towns and National Parks.  It is probably one of the finest roads that I have ever driven on.  We stopped at a few of the look out points and the pinnacle of our trip was the 12 Apostles.  The formations that have been shaped by the unrelenting waves and wind that have hit the limestone formations for millions of years.  South from of here there is nothing but Antarctica, about 5000km.  The waters are

The London Arch -it used to be a bridge 🙂

cold and the beaches of Victoria although spectacular and great for surfing are not great for swimming, the same actually goes for most beaches around Australia.  I still believe that the best beaches can be found around the Mediterranean.  We then stopped at the London Arch (formerly London Bridge) and then at the 12 Apostles.  At the 12 Apostles there were hundreds of tourist, not sure where all these people came from, as most of the other spots along the route were not nearly as crowded.  I dislike these huge crowds, all these package (or as I like to call them packaged) tourists that go on a well beaten path laid by thousands before them dictated by special interests that do not allow for any interesting side trips and to me is he most boring form of tourism.  Anyway, we had to weave our way through the masses, it was always a hassle to get the pictures we wanted.  There was the constant roar of helicopters and planes flying overhead, carrying tourists.  You cannot convey that in the pictures, the pictures look great but the masses and the noise did distract from the beauty, the

Awesome!

awesomeness of the formations and the sounds of the ocean. So while it is the most popular spot we enjoyed the other spots more as you could just sit there and marvel in peace and quiet.  The Road also took us inland through rolling hills with spectacular views, we drove through the Great Otway National Park.  This park, while relatively unknown, contains ancient rainforests, tall wet forests, waterfalls and a rugged coastline.  It is also here that we saw the only Koalas that we have seen on all our travels.  We had to pick up our pace but we were also hungry so we stopped at Apollo Bay, a nice little town that is much quieter than Lorne.  It sits at the edge of the Great Otway N.P. and it has a nice little beach.  Of course we went for fish and chips, which this years celebrates its 150th birthday.  I am not sure if we are attracted or somehow it is coded in our DNA but we walk into one of the places and it was owned by Greeks.  Throughout our travels we have met so many Greeks, it was

Beth at the Apostles

really nice as we are Greeks from Greece and not Greeks from Melbourne, that automatically elevates us to a special status and we do occasionally enjoy better prices but always excellent hospitality.  We had to try their own homemade Greek deserts and had kataifi, gianiotiko, etc. while looking out at the sea. Ben as always did put up a show and he was adored by everyone.  This stop lasted longer than we had anticipated and hence had to get going as everyone was getting tired and still had a long way to go.  So we left the Great Ocean Road at Apollo Bay and headed north the way we came.

It was and probably will be for a long time the best and most scenic route we have done.  There is something for everyone and the combination of water, rugged coastline and very nice vegetation is a eyesight to behold.  We will have to return and take more time to explore and hike along the coast, maybe when Ben is at an age where we would not have to carry him.

So long….

Some of the Apostles

Another wonderful beach

A place I'd like to live....

I love the guy!

The travelling family!

Another view of the Apostles

The youngest driver

Beth and the uncle!

The Great Ocean Road and coffee!

Ben enjoying a short hike on The Road

This will be a short post as we are at the airport right now and we will board our flight to Sydney shortly.  So I will start with the important things first, got to keep our priorities straight.  Coffee!  I have yet to taste bad coffee here in Australia and there are coffee houses everywhere.  They are so crazy and proud of their coffee here that Starbucks, that coffee imperialist from Seattle was kicked out or never set foot here.  I do not know which but it does not really matter, they do not seem to have made to shore yet.  I had to learn what to order, there are different kinds to order, long black, flat white, etc. exciting stuff.  It is wonderful just to be able to have a great mug of coffee at a nice side street coffee place and to just observe the people go by about their business.  It is a great combination of good weather, a lively city, “no worries” people and excellent coffee.  How many times did I say coffee in this one paragraph?

Melbourne’s weather has been quite awful for the past week so we had to be careful when to do what.  So we kept delaying our trip to the Great Ocean Road but yesterday was to be the day as our days in Melbourne are counted.  Kyriakos, Beth’s uncle accompanied us during the trip, keeping with our traditions we keep showing Aussies their country :).  We drove south west to Geelong and from there we took the Princess Highway west, they do choose fancy names for their roads all the way to Terang and drove south to Port Campbell.  Port Campbell is almost at the start of the Road when you approach Melbourne from the west.  We did stop and see most of

My BBs near the London Bridge

the major lookout points along the route but had to skip the last part of it as we were running out of time and had to get back.  It take at least a couple days to really enjoy the Road, better if you take three or four days and do some of the hikes. It is very pretty country, the landscape was probably among the best we have seen here in Australia.

I will write another post about our impressions of the road as I know have to get on the plane I have to cut this short.

So long…

Kyriakos, Beth's uncle.

The London Bridge in the background

Amazing Landscape!

Beth and the Apostles

Adelaide Hills, the Wine Country and the beach town

Beth and her Godparents

This past week we have spent meeting with friends of Beth and Beth’s parents. Beth left Australia in

BBQ!

1981 and she was 8 years old at that time. I am surprised how much she remembers from back then. Of course they had seen each other since then but there was a lot of talk about the old times and the new times. It is amazing as I heard stories from Greeks here that are very similar to stories I have heard from the same generation Greeks in the US and I also know of very similar stories from my own family’s past. It was a very hard time but most of them did well, I believe they did much better than if they had stayed in our homeland. It is unbelievable the hardship that those people had to endure

The Pouliotis Family

and the difficulties and challenges they faced in their new adopted countries. Most could not speak the language, the passage down here was mostly by ship and they had to work for well o

Dimi and you know who

ver a year to pay for their passage to Australia.  Here in Adelaide Greeks are everywhere, anywhere one turns can see sign posts with Greek names. They have left a strong influence that, together with other immigrant groups like the Italians, have left a distinct cultural mark, enriching their lives and the lives of this city in many ways. Up in the Adelaide Hills we went to Hahndorf. Lutheran Germans were prosecuted in Germany in the early 1800s and thus sought a new home. Germans were the second significant people that came to the shores of this country looking for a better future and freedom to

The Antarakis Family

express their religion. They found a new country in the rolling hills surrounding the city of Adelaide, there are many small Lutheran churches dotting the area. Hahndorf has a German look and a lot of the eateries and stores sell German food, there are some Fachwerk houses.  We tried the sausages and they were decent but nothing like back home.  We saw people eating Eisbein and Sauerkraut with a beer outside in 30C weather!  It was bizarre.  We went on to Mt. Barker and drove up to the summit where we

Dirk Meinhertz Hahn

had an incredible view of the surroundings.

The following day we went the other direction towards Barossa Valley and the wine country around Adelaide.  Barossa Valley also has a distinct German touch, there are also many Lutheran churches around.  It is incredible how many wineries there are in South Australia.

On Mt. Barker Summit

Australia is now the fourth largest exporter of wine in the world behind France, Italy and Spain.  Barossa Valley is most known for its Shiraz, but there are excellent Rieslings as well and of course many more.  We visited the Seppeltsfield winery, they also have a self taught chocolatier on the winery, who was inspired by the movie “Chocolat”.  When I watched that movie I was inspired to eat 200 euros worth of pralines within a week, I guess each to his own.  We then moved on to Clare Valley, which in my eyes looked like Barossa Valley albeit much smaller.  Riesling in Australia has its home in this valley.  It was a great day and

Hahndorf

we spend it with Dimi, Beth’s childhood friend, who once about 37 years ago held my wife’s hand without asking me, he is a great dude though so I let it slide.

I have been told Adelaide is actually a beach town, if I remember correctly around 80% of Australians live within 20 or 30 miles of the sea.  So in my book that most towns in Australia are beach towns.

The beach at Glenelg

Well, what better way to see what kind of beach town we are talking about by driving down to Glenelg, the first settlement on mainland Australia according to Wikipedia.org.  Reading up on this plush and popular beach side suburb I also came across a new word that I will use when possible to impress native English speakers.  The word is “palindrome”, a Greek word by the way, and Glenelg is such a word.  It can be read in either direction.  About the Glenelg beach there is not really that much that I can w

My BBs on the Glenelg jetty

rite, I have never seen beaches anywhere as good as our beaches on the Mediterranean (Greece, Spain, Turkey, Italy, etc.).  I have yet to see the South Sea though so there might be something better.  As you can tell we were not really impressed by the beach or the waters in Glenelg  Also, similar to the Henley Beach that we had visited a couple weeks ago the waters are rough, and there is just too much build around it.  We like our beaches to be away from major settlements, the waters should be clear.  That is nearly impossible here with the big waves pounding the beach.

The Family!

Mosley Square is right at the beach and it does look good looking into the town with all the shops and the tram that arrives from Adelaide.  The jetty also has an interesting story and at 215m it is only about two thirds of the original one that stood a little farther away.  It is also from the jetty that the Greek Orthodox Bishop releases the cross on the Epiphany each year on January 6th.  Glenelg though has not been able to escape the high rise development that started in the late 70’s.  Farther afield, in a corner of the marina we saw a replica of the HMS Buffalo.  It was this ship that carried Rear-Admiral Hindmarsh, head of a small fleet of ships that carried the first British settlers for the colony, in

Mosley Square

December of 1836.  It really is a very young country in some regards.  The replica doubles as a restaurant and a museum, unfortunately both were closed when we were there.

Barossa Valley

On Saturday we were invited at a baptism, Beth’s Godparent’s daughter who was also a witness at our wedding in 1999; baptized her daughter Eirini.  It was the first time that I saw a round church like that.  It is a very significant event in the life of a Christian-Orthodox.

He is so handsome!

Here is more proof!

...and some more!

After a few days in Adelaide I was getting anxious about finally heading out to the real Outback, we planned to leave Adelaide on Feb the 22nd and head out to Coober Pedy for an overnight stay and then on to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, where we had to stay in Yulara (there is nothing else out there).  Beth was not really thrilled to drive 1600 km through nothingness and hostile – especially to city people like us- environment.  I was ready for the wide open road…
So long…