Adelaide, SA – Part 3

Adelaide seems to be one of the forgotten cities in Australia.  It seems forgotten as not many people outside this country have heard anything about it, and within Australia it seems to be bypassed by just about everybody, they go to Perth or Melbourne, of course Sydney, maybe Brisbane but not Adelaide.  We have not yet seen the other ones so I cannot really compare this city to any other in Australia at this point but this city is

Adelaide Skyline

very comfortable, it does have more of a country feel.  Its streets are very wide, there is practically no traffic jams.  It has a very good climate, albeit a bit on the dry side.  There does not seem to be any particular rush even during lunchtime in the CBD people do not seem to be overly stressed, there is no hectic.

The downtown area is also very compact, we walked along the Torrens river and the view as you can see in the pictures is very nice.  The walk around the river is very pretty, everything is green as the city uses recycled water as of late to water the parks.  There were lots of birds everywhere, I could not believe that we were in the immediate downtown area and there was absolutely no noise, it was very serene and relaxing.

We went to the Central Market, which describes itself as the “heart

Adelaide Skyline

Beth and Ben

of Adelaide”.  It is a very colorful place, with lots of stalls selling all kinds of foods along side with different cafes.  It is interesting as it was bustling, a very stark contrast to the city outside.  Chinatown is next to the market and we choose a place to have lunch were the signs were illegible, it is mostly a safe bet that the food is going to be more authentic than the food you get in other places.  The quality was excellent and the prices were quite good.

The Central Market

Victoria Square looking north

It was a really hot day but we wanted to walk the center of Adelaide, the famous Victoria Square.  Adelaide has a nice practical grid layout and although I have a navigation system to guide me to wherever we want to go I have by now gotten the basics and I can navigate the city without any issues.  Down here they say: no worries mate!  The grid is centered on Victoria Square, all the streets radiate from there and right in the middle of the square, actually it has a diamond shape, is a big statue of Queen Victoria.

Queen Victoria, err a statue of hers, actually.One of the things that I have noticed and I have not really found an explanation yet is the sizes of different drinks.  In Australia a can of coke has 375ml in Europe or the US it has something like 335ml.  There are bottles of water with 1.25l, we do not have them anything like that, the same goes for yoghurts, butter, and an array of other products the sizes are just a little bit different than what I have seen in Europe and the US.  I wonder who decides on those things and what the rationale is behind a can of soda having 375ml or 335ml?  Is it economics?  Anyhow, this is no biggie but still a bit odd.

So long…

Here are some random videos of the past few weeks.

Our first Outback Experience – Part 2

Although we had seen signs warnings us of Kangaroos we had not seen one yet but as soon as we turned off the main road to head to Wilpena Pound Resort (a fancy name for an excellent motel that was trying to be more than it should) we saw Emus and Kangaroos. There is something to be said about being in a place where wild animals still roam free and along side humans.  Outside the reception area there

Ben and Beth, it was getting warm

was a place where many Kangaroos had gathered and many of the guests were taking pictures.  We arri

St. Mary's Peak, 1170m

ved just in time to see the General Store and the Visitors Center close.  Why does everything in Australia close so early?  We booked a scenic flight over the area at the reception for early next morning.  We choose the 30 minute flight that took us around the Wilpena Pound as well as the Elder Range, Edeowie Gorge, Heysen Range, Lake Torrens (no water, only salt), Bunyeroo Gorge, Brachina Gorge, St Mary Peak and the Pound Gap.

Woke up early, we had to get Ben out of bed at 7am but he took like a champ.  The airstrip was only a couple k’s away, of course like most airstrips around here it was not

The plane landing

sealed, there were a few Cessnas parked but no one to be seen but a few kangaroos crossing the landing strip.  That raised a eyebrow, how do you swerve around a kangaroo when you go full throttle ready to take off?  It was not long before the plane, a Cessna 182 landed and a young pilot, Hayden flashed us a sm

Beware of Emus crossing the road

ile and welcomed us in the plane with just four seats.  I asked him about the kangaroos, in the typical nonchalant aussie tone he told me not to worry.  Those of you who know me know that I have flown many times but flying in this little plane was a new experience.  It was a pleasant short flight with spectacular views an amazing landscape.  A landscape that formed millions of years ago, an ancient landscape that is unlike any other.  A landscape that was hidden away to anyone outside the aborigines, until the late 1800s.

Ben was sleeping!

When we landed half an hour later the temperature had risen considerably, the swings in temperature is amazing.  We had seen the area from above and realized that we needed a 4WD in order to see some of the spectacular gorges so we inquired at the visitor’s center.  They told us to head up to Blinman and ask at the hotel.  We also decided to postpone the hike into the pound for the next morning, by the time we would have reached the Wangara Lookout it would be mid-day and that is too hot for walking and too sunny to take good pictures.  We then spend the next few hours lounging around the hotel, we had coffee and I finally had a Punch Punch!  It had been a long time since I had a good cigar like that; Ben had his mid-day nap and sometime in the

I was carrying the water and the nappies!

afternoon we drove north to Blinman.  Blinman is about 60km north of Wilpena Pound and it is the highest town in South Australia, in the 1850s they found copper in the area.  You can check a 360 picture of the main street here.  We wanted to check the general store, despite the fact that it was still 4pm, the store had closed as business was slow on that particular day.  We decided to head for the hotel and see about that 4WD.  The hotel was really nice and the coffee was really good.  Unfortunately, a rainstorm caught up with us and it was a bad one.  We were advised to head back to the hotel quickly as flash floods would cut off our way south.  True enough when we reached our hotel we were told that there were people stuck in Blinman, the extend of the flash floods only became apparent on our way back to Adelaide a couple days later.  On our way back we stopped at some locations and took pictures on some lookouts.  I was lucky

Ben after his nap, Beth after reaching the first marker.

enough to get a nice picture of the storm that was brewing over Blinman that I posted on my last posting.  By the time we returned to the hotel rain had caught up with us again.  There was not much to do but go to the bar have a beer and meet the many Germans and French that seemingly were the only nationalities present.  It is interesting but we have met so many people from Europe travelling in Australia. I guess there are so many interesting things to see and down under.

Early in the morning we got ready and after checking with the visitors center about the weather and the general condition, it was still cloudy and wet, we headed into the direction of the Pound.  The first 3.3 km would take us through a very easy walking trail, the last 600 meters would be a steep walk up to an altitude of 900m to the two Wangara Lookouts.  The view from the Lookouts was breathtaking. Throughout the walk we met again many Germans, if anything had gone wrong we would have been ok as we speak

The view from the Wangara Lookout

their language.  One thing that we were warned about were the flies and we got our first encounter during the walk, we have never seen so many flies.  They tell us that it will get worse when we travel to the red center, so we have bought fly nets for us, we are not sure yet what we can do for Ben as he did not like the net.  We did the walk in 2 1/2 hours by the time we were back the temperature had risen

Mother and son with a Kangaroo in the distance.

considerably, so we headed back to the air conditioned room.  In  the afternoon we drove around on sealed roads as we did are not allowed to take our hired car on non paved road.  We went and took pictures of the Cazneaux tree, named after the famous Australian photographer who immortalized it in 1937 with his

The Cazneaoux tree

depiction of it called “The Spirit of Endurance”.  These gum trees are magnificent, they were here long before we were born and they will outlive all of us.  Here looking at the Cazneaux tree with the Pound in the background one realizes the land itself is ancient, the formations that we saw were hundreds of millions old.  The country we know as Australia maybe really fresh but its land is far from it.

The next morning we packed and left the resort early, Ben had some tummy problems and we rushed as fast as we could towards home in Adelaide.  Rushing is only a figure of speech as the highway here is

They are having fun.

limited to 110kmh and it is for the most part a one lane highway!  What also surprised me is that the highway is not dotted with rest/service areas as we know them in Europe or the US.  We found some gas stations every 60km or so and the occasional hotel -hotels in Australia are usually the pubs, not necessary a hotel as I understand it. Funny is that this was the stretch of highway in the more densely populated part of SA between Port Augusta and Adelaide.  What will we encounter next week when we drive back the same highway past Port Augusta towards Cooper Pedy and Uluru?  Well, we will take lots of water with us and probably some extra diesel just to be safe.

One of the things that has surprised me here in Australia is the lack of education about conserving water and how cheap water is.  This is after all the driest continent and country in the world and SA is the driest state in this country, nevertheless people use too much water of which more than 60% is used to water gardens and plants that have no place in this country to begin with.  The cost of water is about 1/4 of the cost we have in Germany!  No wonder people let the water running when brushing their teeth or shaving!  There is something to be said about how conscious we are in Germany about this matter despite abundant water, we have learned to conserve and leave for the most part more efficient -high cost and taxation do work after all.

In the past few days we have been going places around Adelaide, will post fresh pictures and a new post soon.

So long….

What an angel!

Dramatic and spectacular!

A small pond along the hike.

Ben hiking!

The way up to Wangara Lookout

Can you spot Beth?

Can't get enough looking at them two!

Is he going to become a pilot?

Lake Torrens, a dry lake!

An HDR image!

Our first experience in the Outback – Part 1

Before I go on to describe our excursion into the Flinders Ranges, which in effect is in the Outback I want to give you an idea of how big and diversified Australia is.  The basics that you might have heard before is that Australia is the only continent that is a country and the only country that is a continent, it is I believe the largest island.  It is about as big as the continental USA and it has about 22 million inhabitants. More than 80% of the population are within a few miles from the sea and besides the cities of AdelaideBrisbaneCanberra,CairnsDarwinHobartMelbournePerth and Sydney there is not much else.  Imagine that, a whole continent with less than 10 major urban centers.  We were driving in, relatively speaking, the more densely populated parts of the  country and there were times when we did not see a car for 30-40min, driving at a 100kmh.

Watch out for those kangaroos!

Main Street, Gladstone, SA

Some of the older towns we passed through were founded in the late 1800s, my grandfather was born in 1897!  Sydney, the oldest of the cities established by white men, was founded in 1788, that is 12 years after the birth of another young nation across the Atlantic (or across the Pacific if you sit where I am now).  Melbourne the second biggest city here was declared a city by Queen Victoria only in 1847 the same year that Siemens was founded in Germany and the same year that Alexander Graham Bell was born.  In England the first Industrial Revolution was already over.  This country is so new and vast it is difficult to describe.  I thought I was prepared, I have driven for hours in parts of rural Russia (Russia is the biggest country) and I have driven from coast to coast in the USA and I am still surprised at how vast and sparsely

Main Street, Wirrabara, SA

populated this land is.

We wanted to get up and leave Adelaide early but it was almost 10am before we left Adelaide on the A1 in the direction of Port Augusta and about 200km north of Adelaide we got off the highway and headed for the hills on a parallel road, the Main North Rd,  that took us through GladstoneLaura, Stone Hut, Wirrabara, Wongyara, Murray Town, MelroseWilmingtonQuornHawker onto our final destination the Wilpena Pound.  We stopped at some of these towns, they do have that certain feeling of being frontier towns.  They do offer many outdoor activities as they are located along the Flinders Ranges

Melrose, SA

and also Mount Remarkable National Park.  Quorn and Hawker are also significant as they were along

War Memorial

the original Ghan railroad line that went through Oodnadatta to Alice Springs.  Actually in Quorn one can still ride the Pichi Richi railroad, which at least partly runs on the old Ghan railroad line.  February is still the summer here in Australia (it is the low season for tourism) so I cannot be certain but these towns seemed to be forgotten, way past their prime and somehow living in their past, trying to hang on to a former glory that never really came to be.  Quorn though was the most interesting of them all and apart of some modern signs it could be a real frontier town, it really seemed like we were in a movie set.

The railroad station in Quorn, SA

One of the things that I noticed in all the towns is that they all have memorials to theirs soldiers of WWI, WWII, Korea, etc. (picture on the right is from the memorial in Wirrabara). It is incredible that these people from these remote villages left their tranquil towns to fight and ultimately sacrifice their lives thousands of km away from their homes.  We had a significant force of Australians in Greece during WWII.  Their most painful memory of course is Gallipoli.

This is the first part, I am almost finished with the second part and I will have it online by tomorrow.

So long….

Wide open road into nothingness, welcome to the Outback!

Kangaroos welcoming us to the hotel.

A quick update

I have finally managed to get an internet connection. I had to, Lost was on a couple days ago and there is no way I am going to miss an episode, not now… ….not in the final season. Well, we had a thunderstorm yesterday and we rushed back to the hotel as flash floods are very common and we do not have the right wheels to be able to deal with it.  We should’ve gone 4WD, there is no other way to explore this land.  Today we hiked 8km to the Wangara Lookout, which oversees Wilpena Pound, the last 600 meters were a killer as we had a steep ascend on rocks that magnified the heat.  This land is ancient, the formations here are very very old and it looks unlike anything we have seen.  It is at least as impressive as Monument Valley.  We have met quite a few Germans, there are more of them than Aussies here.  We are staying here another night and we will be back in Adelaide tomorrow evening.

Oh yes, Ben of course was with us. See the pics for proof…

…and yes Lost is better than ever!

On Wangara Lookout, a very happy family!

Wilpena Pound from the Wangara Lookout

Ben and Beth before our flight over the Pound

The view North from Stokes Lookout

Wilpena Pound from the air

Oh yes, that is the plane. A Cessna 182.

Our hotel from the air

The landing strip!

Ben is our hero! He was smiling all the way...

Wilpena Pound in the Flinders Ranges, SA

After a long drive through wondeful country roads we have made it to Wilpena Pound, the hotel here is great, Kangaroos and Emu all over the place. It is hot, we had more than 40C all day yesterday. Flew over the Pound, amazing! We will hike around for the next couple days and then back to Adelaide. This is an amazing country, I love it already.
Ben, well there are no words to describe the little man. He has not stopped smiling, maybe he is laughing at us…. who knows!

Willl post properly once I get internet connection again. There is no recepetion here, we are in the woods.

So long…