Flying back to Germany

It has been a long 18 months since we left Germany. A lot of things have happened since we left, our Australian adventure has progressed so much that we now call Australia home. I am now on my way back to Germany for a quick trip that mixes pleasure, catching up with family and friends and business as I am going to an exhibition that I promised myself that I will visit next time.

I am sitting in an Etihad A340-600 at close to 40.000ft and we are fast approaching Abu Dhabi, this will be my first through the Arabian peninsula and this has been my longest flight, we have been flying for 13 1/2 hours and we have about one more hour to go. We have been flying into the night and thus this has been one of my longest nights too, albeit a sleepless one. I have very mixed feelings about going back, sure I am excited but how will I feel? Will it be as I remember it? The mind does very funny things and we shape our memories not always as what it really was but for we wanted it to be. It is not only subjective, it is influenced by many factors and it surely is different for anyone going through a similar experience.

People asked me if I am going home and I reply, one of my homes and I have at least four now. This will not change because my belongings are in Melbourne now, sure it is home but home for me is defined very different to how other people define it. I am a traveller and as any good traveller I have no fixed plans and I do not believe that I intent to ever arrive. What that really means I am not sure but I suspect that Melbourne may not be the last station, although friends recommend and people suggest that I eventually will have to as I will get older, mellow down and I also will have to think of my pension and such. Well there is 25+ years to go, that is more years, a lot more years than what I have behind me since I started working so I believe I will be all right.

Our view…

Our views have been shaped by the experiences that have brought us to this point in our life.  In principal this is not very different to the other immigrants to Australia, what makes it unique in its own way are the nuances of these experiences and that is our view.

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Sunset in Hallet Cove, South Australia

I cannot talk about these views without putting them in context and speaking a bit about our last station, Germany.  I have lived in four different countries and Germany is by far the one place that comes close to perfection more than any other and it is the place where I have lived the longest.  The efficiencies, the frugality, the thoroughness and a global conscience  that is the collective German way of life has developed over the past 6 decades is unprecedented.  A good friend of mine from Russia described it as a very boring place because everything works and it is near automatic, isn’t it ironic as it sounds a no worries kind of place yet it so far from it on daily basis as Germans are overall very formal, distant and constantly unsatisfied and then Germany has that terrible weather.

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Footy!

Australia is a great place in many ways, life is for some reason just easy-going and the mild weather makes for an excellent outdoor lifestyle.  In our view though it is far from perfect and that maybe the curse of just knowing to many homes.  Things are made unnecessary complicated  in more ways than we could have imagined when we arrived.  Simple things like setting up and proving your 100 points of id as they do in Oz so you can get basic services takes time, patience and above all it costs nerves.  The surprise is that one would have thought that there would be someone who can or should tell you what you will have to do and how to do it, the onus is on the newcomer.  In a country that welcomes so many thousands of immigrants you would have thought there would be more to it.  That is not the case and while it is not rocket science per se, it is made more difficult by the incompetence, the lack of systems and of processes for new arrivals in the country.  Beyond that even matters that one would believe is common sense are relative complicated, such as trying to get decent broadband, a matter that is trivial anywhere in urban Europe, US or Japan, has cost us at least a couple thousand dollars and countless hours on the phone with providers, as well a broken lease and countless hours on the matter of leasing properties, our rights and obligations.  It is amazing that in 2013 this is an issue, I would understand it if I was in Alice Springs or some other place in the outback or the countryside.

Ben in Melbourne

I am not going to compare here every little aspect but suffice to say that having moved between four countries over the past twenty years, I have never had as many issues, not even when I moved back to Greece in 1996 from the US and had to deal with the incompetent civil servants.  Unexpected because Australia is a modern society and it is one of the most urbanized nations on the planet, the envy of many and the place where many people dream to be able to get a chance at calling it home.

I am not, in any way, saying that this is an awful place, quite the contrary, despite our tribulations and the various costs both monetary and otherwise we are looking forward to the next 12 months with renewed confidence that things will be better, they will improve and we will finally be able to get more out of the Aussie lifestyle.  It is not a post of despair nor is it one of disappointment.  It is merely our experiences and while there certainly have been difficult times we have had luck with family and friends that have supported us all along.

 

Global Citizen

It is no secret that I despite the fact that I am Greek by birth I feel more at home in an anglophone world.  The irony is, I spend most of my life in the German world and I carry a German passport, indeed it is my “main” passport.  I am at home here. My wife holds two passports, my son holds three, despite his young age of 3 he seemingly understands three languages.  A lot of people here find it peculiar and in many countries the law does not even allow such things.  A lot of people frown upon it as they do not seem to understand how or why that is possible.

I understand that sometimes it is hard to comprehend but I always felt at home wherever I went and I believe we will feel at home in Australia.  I have no doubt that once we have settled down in place that we will have rent or bought we will feel that we had been around for much longer than we actually have.  I have travelled so much and there are many countries where I feel I could settle without any major issues.  This obviously is not a talent, it is just reality that has grown from years of experiences with people from all over the world.  I have family and friends in many places and I can relate to them, I know what routine looks and feels like for many of them and funny enough I have myself been stuck in traffic in many cities around the world be it New York, be in New Delhi or Tokyo.

I believe though that there is a deeper underlying reason for this, I believe people everywhere are very similar in so many ways.  The basic needs of providing for your family, the sense of belonging, the need for recognition, etc. are the same everywhere.  Obviously, there are big differences on how some of those needs are fulfilled and the only thing that I can say is that I have been very respectful and mindful on those differences.  People have a tendency to complicate things but once you can go past that and see the simplicity, there is a lot of beauty.  At the end of the day you get out of most anything whatever you put in, and we are going to put everything in our new lives in our new country.  Hope….